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#686: Don't Pitch a Prospect Until You Know You Are Ready

Posted By Mark Haas CMC FIMC, Monday, October 31, 2011
Updated: Monday, October 31, 2011
My track record of getting appointments with prospects is pretty good but there are times the pitch just doesn't go over very well. I always do my research and have a lot of ideas ready to pitch but, more often than not, they just don't seem to connect.

Experienced consultants develop protocols for much of what they do. After many years of delivering similar services, they have honed efficient setup and processes for delivering most of their services. They have the AIDA down pat. They have a storyboard. They conenct emotionally with the prospect's pain, not just their aspirations. For some consultants, however, this need for well-defined processes seems not to apply for prospect meetings.

You say you do your research on the prospect ahead of time but you also say you arrive with lots of potential ideas. This may be where you run astray. Think of it from the client's perspective. They have lots of issues to deal with but probably only a very few they are prepared to talk to you about. To a prospect, your talking about a lot of things you could do for them sounds like you are selling yourself, not solving their problem. If you really have done enough research, you will know the top three issues the prospect needs to address. If you are the right person for the job, then you will have a very tightly scripted pitch to get right to the point of pain. Doing that will keep prospects focused on what you can do for them, not what they need to do for you.

Tip: If you can't identify 1-3 issues the prospect has a passion for, has a need to fix, and lacks the capability in house to solve, then you don't know enough. It may be that you could meet with the prospect to listen and gather more information, but it is better to understand the issue well enough to be able to craft your rather robust process to solve it. Finally, it is worth the effort to dry run your pitch. Don't consider practicing your pitch as something only a novice consultant does. The confidence you gain from a perfectly practiced pitch wears off onto the prospect.

© 2011 Institute of Management Consultants USA

Tags:  consulting process  customer understanding  market research  marketing  meeting preparation  proposals  sales 

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