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The IMC USA Chair & CEO periodically reports on the state of the Institute, including new benefits to members, strategic affiliations with other organizations, business issues affecting the consulting profession, member accomplishments, chapter activities, and activities of the International Council of Management Consulting Institutes (ICMCI).

 

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How Do You Deal With Discomfort?

Posted By David T. Norman FIMC CMC-AF, Sunday, May 15, 2011
Commenting on my previous blog which discussed ethics, http://www.imcusa.org/members/blog_view.asp?id=327070&post=125582&#comments, Jennifer Leake, a fellow CMC from the Southeast, raised a thought-provoking question.

First, as background, her comment was about how (and I'm paraphrasing her) consultants when they get together invariably share stories of their work with clients and, all too often, share the client's name and, perhaps, even references to the problem. Jennifer said, appropriately, that such sharing made her 'uncomfortable' and then asked, "How can one tactfully share this discomfort with a fellow consultant?"

She has, once again, caused me to think about our Code of Ethics. Take again #5.0, as quoted in the previous Message From the Chair, and excerpting, " ... I will treat appropriately all confidential client information that is not public knowledge, take reasonable steps to prevent it from access by unauthorized people ... "

My personal take on this is simply not to share private information. Since becoming a CMC in 1988, I have taken an easy stance on this -- I don't share. Take (my much dated) website, for example, I have no client names, logos or anything identifiable listed. I do have testimonials, but not only do I have their permission but also the client names have been simplified (for example, Steve B) with only a generic industry name. This practice allows me to tell prospects that I will also keep our relationship confidential. But, that's the way I deal with the public side of confidentiality. With that being said, I know some of my peers will post client names, logos, and testimonials with written permission.

But, that didn't address Jennifer's question: "How can one tactfully share this discomfort with a fellow consultant?" I have my ways (e.g., I'm pretty upfront with them), but let's ask our members to help Jennifer, and, indeed, all of us in IMC USA.

So, here's the scenario -- you are in a meeting (such as a Chapter meeting) with other fellow consultants and one begins to address a client problem he/she is working on and, in the process, is using personal names, situations, and problems in quite some detail You become uncomfortable as you listen.

Comment, please, on 'how you would tactfully share this discomfort with a fellow consultant?' Let's create a conversation folks (and let's not make it a discussion on the Code of Ethics language or intent, rather about answering this other important question). Stay tuned, My best, David

Tags:  Code of Ethics  confidentiality  Ethics 

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